Acceptance Is A Path To Less Suffering

      For after all, the best thing one can do when it is raining, is to let it rain.  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

In Episode 6 of my podcast, 10 Minutes To Less Suffering, I discuss the concept of acceptance.  Acceptance can be difficult for some of us because it is about making peace with something we don’t like or that causes us physical or emotional pain. Also, the world around us often tells us to focus on overcoming our problems and persevere until we achieve our goals.  Many of us believe this means we should not accept things in our lives that we don’t like, however, this is the biggest misconception about the idea of acceptance.  When you accept something, it does not mean you will not try to improve your life or achieve your goals. Instead, acceptance is about not arguing with reality and letting go of the pain we experience when we resist what is happening.  It often takes courage and strength to accept life the way it is in the moment. But, the ability to accept things is the beginning to finding peace and MAYBE even making our situation better.

So, if you are still struggling with the results of our last presidential election, upset you did not get a raise, concerned your child is struggling or unhappy about how things are going in your life, this podcast will give you tools to help you accept situations in your life and find a way to move forward and create the life and world that you desire.

Here is the link to the podcast. It really only takes 10 minutes to suffer less!

 

 

 

Episode 3 – Letting Go of Regret

I can’t count the number of times a client has come into my office over the past 20 years reciting missed opportunities or wrong choices they made as the reason they are unhappy or not successful today. Sometimes their stories are about a business they didn’t start, a boyfriend or girlfriend they didn’t marry, or a class their child did not take.

Similar to my clients’ stories, most of us can easily think of a decision we regret.   Our regret makes us feel sure we missed out on an amazing opportunity or experience.  Regret makes us believe we’re not living our best life.  However, we can never truly know how a decision we didn’t make would have worked out.   Maybe that decision would have led us in a direction that would not have been beneficial for reasons we won’t ever know.  All we know is that here we are in this moment with the hope and possibility that Maybe we can have the life we want from this day forward.

In this episode of my 10-minute podcast, I discuss how regret can be a terrible source of suffering and how we can start to let it go and expand what is possible. The more you do the exercise in the podcast, you will begin to find more peace and freedom to envision and pursue a new future. It’s so powerful not to be hijacked by the past and be in the moment with a clean slate.

For all we know, Maybe the best is yet to come!

Click here to listen to the podcast.

 

Episode 2 – Living A Life of Gratitude

When we think about being GRATEFUL for everything in our lives, most of us immediately think “of course I am grateful.” I am grateful for my family and friends, my good health, and numerous other things.  But the truth is that our mindset of being grateful has a tendency to come and go.  One minute we are grateful and the next minute we might lose some money or have a problem with a client or our child is struggling and we become completely consumed by the problem.  Our problems can become the lens through which we see our lives.  But if we can find a way to live a life of gratitude, it can shift our perspective and help us make the blessings in our lives our foundation.  When we do this, our problems are softened and they easily find their rightful place.

Click this link to listen to Episode 2 of my podcast, Living A Life of Gratitude, and learn some simple techniques to help you maintain this great perspective and experience more joy and possibility in your life.

A Survival Guide For Uncertain Times Week #3: Give up Positive Thinking

American optimism and positive economic sentiment in the United States of America as a national government hope metaphor as a wiper clearing the gray dark wet clouds with 3D illustration elements.

It is the end of week three of Donald Trump’s presidential term, and this week my Survival Guide will address the pitfalls of positive thinking. I have spoken to many people who didn’t vote for Donald Trump and are now struggling with his daily tweets, executive orders and Cabinet appointments. I find that many of the people I spoke to are either completely negative about Trump’s Presidency or are trying to stay positive and failing miserably.

When you are completely comfortable with uncertainty, a positive outlook comes naturally. You are not rattled by new events or tweets and can sustain faith that life will work out one way or another. It doesn’t mean you are not concerned or active in your community, you just tend not to worry so much about the future. Most people, though, have some degree of fear of the unknown, and turn either to negative or to positive thinking to help themselves feel certain, while deep down they are really afraid. The problem is that the certainty we seek doesn’t exist. The more we try to lock into any perspective, the more pain and chaos we feel.

A person feeling negativity towards the Trump administration will feel pain most of the time because they are always projecting that whatever is occurring today cannot get better or that bad things are sure to happen in the future. The person Continue reading…